Skip to main content

About your Search

20130124
20130201
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)
states which is under, and if we don't resolve some of the debt ceiling and some the spending cuts, when you get into some of the fiscal order that you're talking about, you're going to have that weight on it. and even though you have proposed a lot of folks with japan in terms of some of the political leadership, they are still at negative growth with 7%. so now you're up to 50% or so of world gdp that is a drag on the economy. how do you look at the broadest sense of contagion as it relates to emerging market growth, developing country growth, with 50% of world gdp possibly in a situation? >> i think the trade figures tell at all whether you agree with that or not. i think the trade figures show what's happening. and there's no doubt picking one of the countries you mentioned, china. i mean, china for the last 20 years has been double-digit growth. last year they had one of the worst years in recent memory, we will see the final figures coming out. it didn't get below 7% which i view as a hard landing. but when you move from double-digit down to seven something are sent back, and one o
the debt ceiling ultimately unless they get severe spending cuts and the obama administration is not going to give it to them. you're going to watch the u.s. do crazy, crazy things this year. >> he was pretty clear. he called it crazy. i talked to eric cantor earlier, the republican majority leader. he sort of said we're ready to deal and compromise, but people are very worried about what the u.s. could do. >> oh, and this latest decision to just kick the can, i hate to use the cliche, further down the road, axel neighbor is a former central banker in europe, also the head of ubs and he was absolutely in no doubt that what we are seeing in the u.s. in the political and economic process is dangerous. >> if you have the debt ceiling, the europeans will talk about how you can make that binding. in the u.s., the concern is much more whether you can lift it in time in order not to put too much break on the economy. now, the u.s. economy has bottomed out, it's coming back, and i think sooner or later the u.s. has to face the fiscal issue not just in the sense of delaying adjustment but really ma
congress voted to suspend the debt ceiling for three months this week, effectively raising the country's borrowing limit while they figure out deeper cuts to reduce the deficit. that keeps me employed for at least a few more months. even before that deadline hits again, march 1st will be on us, the so-called sequester deadline. that's a stupid washington name for a stupid and dangerous washington creation, the automatic across-the-board spending cuts. then there's another date to worry about, april 15th. not just tax filing day but the date by which congress has promised to adopt a budget resolution. they even this time stake their pay on it, agreeing to reach a deal or face suspension of their paychecks until they reach a deal. that might just be enough of a carrot to make them actually present a budget that takes on our a bah looning deficit. but that battle may make the recent battle over tax hikes for the rich seem like a friendly game of badminton. big spending cuts are needed and they will hit americans where it hurts -- in their entitlements. i'm talking about health
is that business seemed to respond to all the uncertainties surrounding the debt ceiling. by cutting back on capital investment, and not firing people. there was a lot of anecdotal evidence over that, that they were waiting this out. that maybe they thought this time around it was more bluff and bluster than reality that we'd hit the debt ceiling. and that seems to have paid off. people don't -- employers don't like to fire employees. not only because of, you know, being gentle human beings but because it's costly for them to do that. they tried to hold on. what we seemed to be seeing here right now is i held my exuberance last week because i thought it was a one-off seasonal adjustment thing and you do have to be careful in the month of january, as people come off the rolls because of the seasonal hiring. and there's still some reason for skepticism. but staying down at this level for a second week, joe, we've always said 350 was the bottom of the range, and we're putting in a new bottom down there this 330 that you've got to think about. probably payrolls up near 200,000 or above and ma
as obama was elected are going to cross their arms and they are not going to raise the debt ceiling ultimately unless they get severe spending cuts and the obama administration is not going to give it to them. and you are going to watch the u.s. do crazy, crazy things this year. >> if you are right on those crazy, crazy things, then the rest of us are in for a dreadful, dread full time? >> dreadful. it is going to be so strange for the richest country on earth to cross their arms and say i'm not paying. imagine crossing your arms. you are going to see it this year. >> reporter: now, we have been asking our guests here for the riskometer. on this side we have is the u.s. a bigger threat to global growth in 2013. on this side the e.u. lutnic thinks the u.s. is by far the bigger. as you look overall most people still seem to believe europe is the biggest threat in 2013. by the way, speet tweet me wher think the biggest threat is. >> very official looking. did you make that yourself? >> don't you mock it? it works and it is doing a good job. >> we will have people tweet you and see what
with the debt ceiling. so the sequester is the next thing that republicans -- >> yes, sequester and the budget. and, i don't know what richard things, but my view was -- >> hasn't been a budget in four years -- >> there has been a budget. not a stand-alone budget. they just keep continuing the budget that already exists. >> is that a problem? >> it can be a problem. >> how do you -- >> i think it was -- i blame partisanship in washington. i don't think that's any one person's fault by any means. i think not making the fight about the debt ceiling, which has the unfortunate downside that if you mess it up, the u.s. government defaults, and it's a financial catastrophe, this was a sign of maturity. i think on the republicans' part that let's make it about the budget. so the budget is now going to come to so-called continuing resolution. they're going to have to have a fight about a government shutdown. this is what they should be arguing about. what does the government spend money on? what should it spend money on? how much revenue should be coming in? let's make the argument about that, not abo
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)